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Fabulous Fun Facts: How Does Water Affect Your Coffee?

Madison Company lives and breathes sensors, so of course we get a kick out of fun facts about sensor applications as well. See if you can guess where a sensor is used after you read this Fantastic Fun Fact! (Pssst…. You’ll find the answer in parentheses below!)

Summarized from The National Coffee Association

The right way to make coffee is how YOU like it – but there are a few tips to ensure that perfect cup.

The NCA recommends the following:

  • Make sure that your tools — from bean grinders and filters to coffee makers— are thoroughly cleaned after each use.
  • The quality and flavor of your coffee is not only determined by your favorite brewing process, but also by the type of coffee you select. There can be a world of difference between roasts.
  • Fresh-roasted coffee is essential to a quality cup, so buy your coffee in small amounts.
  • The size of the grind is hugely important to the taste of your coffee. If your coffee tastes bitter, it may be over-extracted, or ground too fine.  On the other hand, if your coffee tastes flat, it may be under-extracted, meaning your grind is too coarse. Brewing methods with longer contact time require a coarser grind (and vice versa – your espresso should be very fine).
  • The water you use is very important to the quality of your coffee. Use filtered or bottled water if your tap water is not good or has a strong odor or taste, such as chlorine. If you’re using tap water, let it run a few seconds before filling your coffee pot, and be sure to use cold water. Avoid distilled or softened water.
  • Your brewer should maintain a water temperature between 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit for optimal extraction. Colder water will result in flat, under-extracted coffee, while water that is too hot will also cause a loss of quality in the taste of the coffee.
  • The amount of time that the water is in contact with the coffee grounds is another important flavor factor. In a drip system, the contact time should be approximately 5 minutes. If you are making your coffee using a French Press, the contact time should be 2-4 minutes. Espresso has an especially brief brew time — the coffee is in contact with the water for only 20-30 seconds.

 

(So where is the sensor? Madison reed-based liquid level sensors are used in commercial coffee makers to detect the levels of water and milk in their tanks.